coronavirus

New Study Shows Covid Vaccines Does No Harm To Fertility

Earlier it was claimed that Covid-19 vaccines could damage both male and female fertility. The logic behind the claim was that Covid-19 vaccines cause early pregnancy loss, failed implantation and other abnormalities in females. While in males, it was claimed that the vaccine could negatively affect the production of sperm.

Google Giving Free Cameras To Asian Business Owners

A new program by Google called AAPI Strong has been started to provide free Google Nest security cameras for Asian business owners across the US as violence against Asian has been on the rise since the COVID-19 pandemic.

Everything You Need To Know About “The Tomato Flu”

A new virus called the Tomato Flu has infected 82 children between the ages of one and five since July 26th of this year in India. The virus first appeared in Kerala, a state in southern India, and has now spread to two other areas.

China Discovers Another Deadly Virus

According to reports, a potentially deadly new virus has been found in China and is thought to have been transmitted from shrews (small mole-like mammals) to people.

Tesla Is No Longer the World’s Biggest EV Producer

BYD, a Chinese automaker backed by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, has soared past Tesla as the world’s leading electric vehicle seller, according to company filings published Sunday on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. BYD sold 641,000 new energy vehicles in the first half of 2022 while Tesla was far behind this number.

Antiviral Facemask That Kills Viruses

Traditional face masks, including N95s and KN95s, offer protection against illness and infection but must be disposed of once they come in contact with viruses, thus generating significant plastic waste. So now, researchers have developed a simple method that would give N95 face masks antiviral and antibacterial properties, which could allow them to be worn for longer durations.

Nasal Vaccines Could Help Stop COVID-19 From Spreading—If Scientists Can Get Them Right

When SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, infiltrates the body, it typically enters through the nose or mouth, then takes root and begins replicating. But what if it could never get a foothold in the upper airways and stopped by just inhaling a few drops of liquid or mist beforehand? That’s the idea behind nasal COVID-19 vaccines, which are meant to prevent infection by blocking the virus at its point of entry.